Zambia and Mpongwe

ZAMBIA

  • Is independent since 24th October 1964 and was before independence a colony of the United Kingdom
  • Is 18 times bigger than the Netherlands
  • Is found in the southern part of Africa
  • Has 8 neighboring countries namely: Tanzania, Mozambique, Malawi, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Namibia, Angola and DR Congo.
  • Has an estimated population of 16,2 million people and is divided in 10 provinces

Before Zambia became independent it was called Northern Rhodesia. The name Zambia is derived from the Zambezi river, which means River of God. There are 73 ethnical tribes in Zambia who all have their own language. Bemba, Nyanja, Tonga, Lozi and Chewa are the most spoken ones. The Bemba people are the biggest ethnic group, 21%.

girls.jpgThe Zambian flag consist of four colors; green, black, orange and red. Each color has a meaning. Green stands for the vegetation of the country, black for her people, orange for the many minerals that are found in the ground and red for the blood that was shed for independence. The African fish eagle completes the flag and is the national bird of Zambia.

 

MPONGWE

  • Lays in the Copperbelt Province, which is in the north west of Zambia and borders directly with DR Congo.
  • Is a district since 1997 and is one of the ten districts in the province.
  • Is 8.339 km2
  • Is a district of farmers. The main income is earned with maize, groundnuts and soya beans.

The population of Mpongwe consists of 48,4% of men and 52,6% women. 80 percent of these people live beneath the poverty line. The yearly population growth of the district consists of 5,8 percent.

There are about 100.000 inhabitants and there around 5.000 orphans.

Mpongwe township is growing hard, but there is not really an urban area near. There is no industrial area. The fact that most people live from farming and have to rely on the rain season is the reason that food insecurity is a big problem.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s